Last edited by Akinolkis
Friday, May 8, 2020 | History

4 edition of Societies of the Arikara Indians. found in the catalog.

Societies of the Arikara Indians.

Lowie, Robert Harry

Societies of the Arikara Indians.

by Lowie, Robert Harry

  • 31 Want to read
  • 11 Currently reading

Published by The Trustees in New York .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Arikara Indians.,
  • Indians of North America -- Social life and customs.

  • Edition Notes

    StatementBy Robert H. Lowie.
    SeriesAnthropological papers of the American museum of natural history. vol.XI, pt.VIII
    Classifications
    LC ClassificationsGN2 .A27 vol. 11, pt. 8
    The Physical Object
    Pagination1 p. l., 645-678 p.
    Number of Pages678
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL6603091M
    LC Control Number17028735
    OCLC/WorldCa3163300

    Information on the Arikara Indians Lewis and Clark's relations with various Indian tribes, including background from the Indian perspective, the best book is James P. Ronda's Lewis and Clark among the Indians. Lincoln: University of Nebraska Press, The very best way to obtain accurate information from the tribal perspective is to. Myths and Traditions of the Arikara Indians is a one-volume selection of narratives reprinted from volumes 3 and 4 of Traditional Narratives of the Arikara Indians (Parks ). The latter work, a four-volume set comprising oral narratives, is the only comprehensive collection recorded in the native language of the major genres in the historical and literary tradition of the Arikaras, a.

    - Lewis and Clark encountered the matriarchal Mandan, Hidatsa, and Arikara societies on their expedition. In this resource from Prairie Public Television, Amy Mossett and Terrence L. O’Halloran explain what these women contributed to society, specifically exploring the earth lodges built to withstand the harsh winters of North Dakota and their harvesting techniques. Full text of "Societies of the Plains Indians" See other formats.

    You know the cause of out making war. It is known to all white men. They ought to be ashamed of it. Indians are not deceitful. The white men speak bad of the Indian and look at him spitefully. But the Indian does not tell lies. Indians do not steal.” ― Howard Zinn, A People's History of the United States. Typical Villages of the Mandan, Arikara and Hidatsa in the Missouri Valley, Lowie, R.H. Societies of the Arikara Indians. Lowie, R.H. Notes on the Social Organization and Customs of the Mandan, Hidatsa, and Crow Indians. New York: Anthropological Papers of the American Museum of Natural History, Vol. XXI, Part I.


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Societies of the Arikara Indians by Lowie, Robert Harry Download PDF EPUB FB2

Additional Physical Format: Online version: Lowie, Robert Harry, Societies of the Arikara Indians. New York, The Trustees, (OCoLC) Societies of the Arikara Indians Paperback – Octo by Robert Harry Lowie (Author) › Visit Amazon's Robert Harry Lowie Page.

Find all the books, read about the author, and more. See search results for this author. Are you an author. Learn about Author Central Author: Robert Harry Lowie.

Societies of the Plains Indians by Wissler, Clark,ed Collection americana Digitizing sponsor Google Book from the collections of unknown library Language English Volume Book digitized by Google and uploaded to the Internet Archive by user tpb.

Lowie, R. Societies of the Arikara Indianspt. Skinner, A. Societies. Societies Of The Arikara Indians [Robert Harry Lowie] on *FREE* shipping on qualifying offers. This is a reproduction of a book published before This book may have occasional imperfections such as missing or blurred pages.

Language. The Arikara language is a member of the Caddoan language a is close to the Pawnee language, but they are not mutually intelligible. [citation needed] As ofthe total number of remaining native speakers was reported as ten, one of whom, Maude Starr, died on 20 January She was a certified language teacher who participated in Arikara language education programs.

Arikara, also called Sahnish, North American Plains Indians of the Caddoan linguistic family. The cultural roots of Caddoan-speaking peoples lay in the prehistoric mound-building societies of the lower Mississippi River valley. Additional Physical Format: Online version: Wissler, Clark, Societies of the Plains Indians.

New York: The Trustees [] (OCoLC) This book, though out of print, is the best-published collection of primary source references concerning William Ashley’s western ventures. William R. Nester, The Arikara War: The First Plains Indian War, (Missoula, MT: The Mountain Press, ).

The Arikara War had causes that predated and repercussions long after the summer of The damming of the Missouri River in caused most tribal members to be relocated.

The Arikaras centered around the town of White Shield, near some of their most important cultural sites. In the s about Arikaras lived on the reservation, and in the U.S. census reported a total Arikara population of 1, Societies of the Arikara Indians.

Anthropological papers of the AMNH ; v. 11, pt. Download directly to your device’s book reader (e.g., iBooks) or drag into your e-books collection on your computer. This item appears in the following Collection(s) Anthropological Papers of the American Museum of Natural History.

Page - The shaft was of blackened ashwood, about 65 feet long, with a spearhead 1 foot in length, which had at one time been fashioned out of flint, but was in later times of tin or steel.

To the shaft there was attached a flap of black cloth, four inches wide and running along the entire length of the stick; the strip of cloth was perforated at intervals, so that it could be secured to.

Members of Arikara tribe performing ceremonial dance in bear costume. Bears used to be common in the region -as Glass found out - and they formed an important part of Arikara culture. Much of Glass's adult life was spent trading and hunting with Indians, interspersed with frequent bouts of attacking and being attacked by them in the vast and.

Cite this Record. Societies of the Arikara Indians. Robert H. Lowie. Anthropological Papers, New York, NY: American Museum of Natural History. (tDAR id: ). The Library of Congress is unaware of any copyright or other restrictions in the Edward S.

Curtis Collection. Absent any such restrictions, these materials are free to use and reuse. The Center asks that researchers approach the materials in this collection with respect for the culture and sensibilities of the people whose lives, ideas, and.

The Mandan joined with the Arikara in By this time, Like-a-Fishhook Village had become a major center of trade in the region. By the s, though, the village was abandoned. In the second half of the 19th century, the Three Affiliated Tribes (the Mandan, Hidatsa and.

Hidatsa, (Hidatsa: “People of the Willow”) North American Indians of the Plains who once lived in semipermanent villages on the upper Missouri River between the Heart and the Little Missouri rivers in what is now North Dakota.

The Hidatsa language is a member of the Siouan language family. Until. The Mandan, Hidatsa, and Arikara Nation (MHA Nation), also known as the Three Affiliated Tribes (Mandan: Miiti Naamni; Hidatsa: Awadi Aguraawi; Arikara: ačitaanu' taWIt), is a Native American Nation resulting from the alliance of the Mandan, Hidatsa, and Arikara peoples, whose native lands ranged across the Missouri River basin extending from present day North Dakota through western Montana.

Societies of the Arikara Indians by Robert Harry Lowie (English) Paperback Book. $ Free shipping. The Ceremonial Societies of the Quileute Indians (Paperback or Softback) unread, unused book in perfect condition with no missing or damaged pages. See the seller’s listing for full details.

See all condition definitions- opens in a Seller Rating: % positive. Sometime during the s, the Arikara Indians suffered through the first in a series of brutal smallpox epidemics.

Over the years, the disease savaged the original populace of nea, so. Tribal History Notes on the Arikara as told to Col. Welch. The Arikara Indians who are they and when did they come to Dakota.

Soldier tells the history of the Arikara to Welch (). How They Came to Live with the Gros Ventre and Mandans (). Crow Ghost talks about Events in Arikara History (). Excavation at Mih-Tutta-Hang-Kush by Welch (). Page - Half an hour is the full time allowed to prepare for the march; but if any one is sick, or their animals have strayed, notice is sent to the guide, who halts till all is made right.

From the time the flag is hoisted, however, till the hour of camping arrives, it is never taken down. The flag taken down is the signal for encamping.Societies of the Arikara Indians () Average rating: 0 out of 5 stars Write a review.

Robert Harry Lowie. Walmart # $ $ 76 $ $ Qty: This scarce antiquarian book is a facsimile reprint of the original. Due to its age, it may contain imperfections such as marks, notations, marginalia and flawed pages.

Brand: Robert Harry Lowie.Myths and Traditions of the Arikara Indians offers a selection of narratives from Douglas R. Parks’s four-volume work, Traditional Narratives of the Arikara Indians. The introduction situates the Arikaras in historical context, describes the recording and translation of the narratives, and discusses the distinctive features of the : UNP - Nebraska Paperback.